Black ash and birds featured at River Talks

The next River Talk will take place at 7 p.m., Wednesday, April 13, via Zoom. Alexis Grinde with the Natural Resources Research Institute and Cole Wilson with the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will present, “Black ash and birds: conserving critical habitat in the St. Louis River Estuary.”

River Talk series ends season with exploration of Sea Grant’s past and future

Let there be cake! On Wednesday, May 11, from 6:30 to 9 p.m. in person at the Lake Superior Estuarium (3 Marina Dr., Superior, Wisconsin) and from 7 to 8 p.m. on Zoom, Sea Grant Director Jim Hurley will present, “Sea Grant at 50: Looking Back, Moving Forward,” examining the formation of this science-based organization devoted to the sustainable use and protection of Great Lakes resources. He’ll also discuss Sea Grant’s current work and where it is headed as it looks ahead to the next 50 years.

Construct wild rice knockers at River Talks

The next River Talk will take place Tuesday, March 8, at the University of Wisconsin-Superior Yellowjacket Union as part of the St. Louis River Summit. Marne Kaeske with the 1854 Treaty Authority will present, “Bawa’iganaakoog (Wild Rice Harvesting Sticks).”

River Talks offers update on Spirit Lake project

The next River Talk will take place at 7 p.m., Wednesday, February 9, via Zoom. Mark Loomis, with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Great Lakes National Program Office, will present, “Update on the Spirit Lake Great Lakes Legacy Act Project.”

River Talks to feature stories of Spirit Island

The next River Talk will take place at 7 p.m., Wednesday, January 12, in person at the Lake Superior Estuarium (3 Marina Dr., Superior, Wisconsin). Jeff Savage, Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa cultural center and museum director, will share “Stories of Spirit Island.”

River Talks to feature Marten Trail plan

The next River Talk will take place at 7 p.m., Wednesday, November 10 via Zoom. Samuel Geer will present, “Revealing the Invisible: Experiencing and Interpreting the St. Louis River along Waabizheshikana (The Marten Trail).”