Social science

Wild rice (Manoomin) education and outreach toolkit for Lake Superior audiences

Manoomin is the only grain native to North America, and it is viewed as essential to the distinct identity of the Ojibwe people. The relationship between the Ojibwe and manoomin is strongly associated with a land ethic that places the human as a part of nature. Coordinated projects by Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin Sea Grant funded by NOAA through the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative aim to address education and outreach needs for manoomin by partnering with tribal partners, identifying what types of outreach materials are needed, and prioritizing target audiences and the needs and aspirations of tribal partners. 

Read more:  Wild rice is focus of NOAA grant, outreach efforts in Lake Superior states

Social science supporting a weather-ready nation: Understanding how urban economically disadvantaged people in Milwaukee receive weather information

As part of National Weather Service’s efforts to create a Weather Ready Nation, Wisconsin Sea Grant is partnering with NWS on a research and outreach project to assess how economically disadvantaged people receive weather information. The use of social science tools such as small group discussions with community leaders and face to face surveys are being used to assess the most effective ways to communicate about severe weather among the urban, rural, and elderly poor in Wisconsin. Results are being presented at conferences and reports will be produced for use among emergency managers, community leaders, businesses, and the public in order to save lives and livelihoods through use of appropriate technology and communication.

Read more:  Sea Grant social scientist to explore influence of severe weather on the economically disadvantaged