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Synthesis Presentations

The HACCP Approach to Prevent the Spread of Aquatic Invasive Species by Aquaculture and Baitfish Operations

Ron Kinnunen, Michigan Sea Grant

  • Unnecessary, poorly designed or unenforceable regulations are costly to government and the industry.
  • The Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point Approach (HACCP) is a preventative and flexible approach that can reduce the risk of transporting AIS through aquaculture activities.
  • The HACCP approach relies on the identification of critical control points and established corrective actions for when problems occur.
  • Record keeping verifies that critical control points are monitored and that corrective actions are taken when necessary.
  • The HACCP approach is supported by both industry and regulators, and it can work as long as there are commitments from personnel in the field as well as management.

Abstract 

Presentation

 

Reducing Risk in an Increasingly Interdisciplinary World: The Role of Bycatch, Distribution Networks and Risky Behaviour as Regulatory Pillars for Live Bait Pathways

Andrew Drake, University of Toronto 

  • When given a large enough sample size, improbable becomes probable.
  • Although bycatch rates are relatively low, and risky trips are infrequent, the sheer volume of activity results in a sizeable number of introductions each year.
  • Key control points exist: manipulating bycatch and release rates provide the best opportunities to manage invasion risk. For example, a 90% reduction in bycatch in Ontario would reduce the most likely number of round goby introduced to zero.
  • Meaningful changes in bycatch and risky behavior obtained through policy, outreach and enforcement have a high probability of reducing introduction risk.
  • Since results are still being published, please contact Dr. Drake for the latest information on his research.

Abstract 

Resources

 

Understanding Schools and Classroom Activities as Consumers of Organisms in the Trade and Pathways for Invasive Species: Turning a Dilemma into a Solution

Samuel Chan, Oregon Sea Grant

  • Teachers obtain classroom organisms from a variety of sources, but mainly (about 2/3rds) from pet stores and biological supply houses. Home, science centers, other teachers, and gather on their own account for the other third.
  • Many different things happen to classroom organisms after their use; release and given to student are common end-use options. Euthanasia is relatively rare.
  • Simple solutions, such as using natives or euthanasia, aren’t as simple as hoped. Native species generally aren’t available when school is in session, and many teachers aren’t willing to euthanize classroom animals.
  • Better end-of-use guidelines and options are needed for teachers.

Abstract  

Presentation

 

The HACCP Approach to Prevent the Spread of Aquatic Invasive Species by Aquaculture and Baitfish Operations

Ron Kinnunen, Michigan Sea Grant

  • Unnecessary, poorly designed or unenforceable regulations are costly to government and the industry.
  • The Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point Approach (HACCP) is a preventative and flexible approach that can reduce the risk of transporting AIS through aquaculture activities.
  • The HACCP approach relies on the identification of critical control points and established corrective actions for when problems occur.
  • Record keeping verifies that critical control points are monitored and that corrective actions are taken when necessary.
  • The HACCP approach is supported by both industry and regulators, and it can work as long as there are commitments from personnel in the field as well as management.

Abstract 

Presentation

 

Organisms in Trade: Disease and Pathways

Nick Phelps, University of Minnesota Extension

  • Pathogens are moving with organisms in trade and will continue to spread without pathway disruption; opportunities for intervention exist.
  • There are many control options, but involving all stakeholders to establish a risk tolerance can help guide appropriate actions.
  • Interruption options can include many of the testing, education and outreach activities that we are currently doing, but tailored to pathogens and disease.
  • We don’t know what is next; be prepared.

Abstract 

Presentation