Wisconsin Teachers and Students Join Expedition to Unlock Lake Michigan Secrets

On June 10, two Wisconsin school teachers and selected elementary and middle school students will get a first-hand view of high-tech tools involved in Lake Michigan science. They will be going out with staff from NOAA programs and the Adler Planetarium on the 50-foot research vessel, Storm, from Manitowoc. They’ll be learning about the technology used to map the lakebed. They will explore a shipwreck with a remotely operated vehicle, and even learn about equipment that could be used to search for a fallen meteor.

Going Deep

Maritime archaeologists prepare to use cutting-edge ROV tech to survey the S.S. Senator, wrecked in more than 400 feet of water.

Fishing for Landslides

The highest water levels in over 30 years on Lake Michigan have caused erosion that threatens people’s homes and property. Wisconsin Sea Grant-funded researchers responded to the problem by developing an instrument that can measure bluff failures and help predict when they might occur.

Wisconsin Sea Grant Student Wins IAGLR Best Poster Award

Nicholas Jordan, a master’s student in the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, was presented with the Best Student Poster Award at the International Association of Great Lakes Research Conference in Detroit in May 2017.

Underwater Treasure

Backed by Wisconsin Sea Grant, maritime archaeologists survey shipwrecks from the historic Goodrich Line.

Marine and Freshwater Librarians to Visit Madison Next Week

A unique group of librarians is holding its first conference in the Great Lakes region next week. They are librarians who specialize in marine and freshwater science topics and who belong to a regional branch of the International Association of Aquatic and Marine Science Libraries and Information Centers. Their conference, “Great Lakes, Great Libraries,” is being held in Madison, May 16-19.

Mapping a New Path

UW-Madison Undergraduate Research Scholar Edgar Reyes is creating story map modules based on marine heritage near Manitowoc–and re-mapping his own future in the process.

Mercury Research Discussed at Next River Talk

The River Talk series wraps up for the season with a talk about mercury research in the St. Louis River Estuary. On Wed. April 12, 7 p.m. at Barker’s Waterfront Grille (Barker’s Island Inn, 300 Marina Dr., Superior, Wis.), Nate Johnson, University of Minnesota Duluth, will present, “Why do Fish in Some Lakes and Streams Have Unsafe Levels of Mercury and Fish in Others Don’t?”